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Spay and Neuter Fact from Fiction

By: Theresa Pitner | August 17, 2019

Fiction: Dogs become fat and lazy after they’re or neutered
FACT: Dogs generally don’t experience a reduced energy level after being spayed or neutered. However, owners still need to avoid over-feeding and under-exercising them.

Fiction: Castration – a word that veterinarians often use in lieu of “neuter”- causes , dogs to be aggressive.
FACT: The only behaviors that might be affected by castration are sexually based behaviors, such as strong attraction to female dogs, roaming and mounting other dogs or people.

Fiction: The use of anesthesia in the surgery can be dangerous, even lethal.
FACT: Anesthesia is safe for dogs as long as the person administering it a qualified veterinary professional and the patient doesn’t have significant diseases, such as cardiac or respiratory diseases, which may increase the rich of anesthesia.

Fiction: Every dog needs at least one heat cycle before surgery.
FACT: There is really no reason to let your dog have a heat cycle prior to having her spayed. Spaying can significantly reduce the risk of mammary cancer, particularly if the surgery occurs before the first heat. Spaying continues to protect against mammary cancer if it’s done before the second or third heat, but the protective effect is less dramatic. 1st Heat occurs generally between 6 -12 months of age. Spaying at 4-5 months of age is a good guideline. Male dogs can be neutered at around this time as well.

Fiction: Female dogs won’t be emotionally fulfilled unless they give birth to a litter of puppies
FACT: Dogs are naturally adept at nurturing their young: however, “parenting “will not- in any way, shape or form-“fulfill “them.

Theresa Pitner

Theresa has worked with people and their beloved canines since her family moved to Salisbury, North Carolina in 2000. Her 20+ years of experience as a social worker has given her the unique perspective that teaching the human is the first step toward understanding and improving the relationship with the family dog.

Training that makes sense!

Understanding Your Dog’s mission is simple, help people and their dogs have the best relationship possible. Theresa Pitner, the experienced dog trainer for Understanding Your Dog, accomplishes this by providing training that makes sense to humans so they can enjoy their relationship with their pet.

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Understanding Your Dog’s mission is simple, help people and their dogs have the best relationship possible. Theresa Pitner, the experienced dog trainer for Understanding Your Dog, accomplishes this by providing training that makes sense to humans so they can enjoy their relationship with their pet.