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Thoughts on Lost and Found Dogs

By: Theresa Pitner | August 17, 2019

30% of pet owners never recover a lost pet (American Animal Hospital Association).

Only 14% of stray dogs at animal shelters are reunited with their owners.

There are factors that determine the behavior and distance before dogs are rescued.  Mostly they act scared and confused.  Sociable dogs may go with a friendly human.  But aggressive or frightened dogs are not as trusting.  They might try to bite or run off blindly to try their way back home.

A lost dog is difficult to find because you don’t always know the direction they went in.  A dog that escaped a fence yard is running in a different pace then a dog that is running because of July 4th fireworks.  A dog lost in a neighborhood most of the time won’t get far vs. a dog lost in a more rural area.  Smaller dogs look more vulnerable and are easier to transport and house then large dogs.  But friendliness, not size, seems to be the most important factor in how far a dog travels.

Theresa Pitner

Theresa has worked with people and their beloved canines since her family moved to Salisbury, North Carolina in 2000. Her 20+ years of experience as a social worker has given her the unique perspective that teaching the human is the first step toward understanding and improving the relationship with the family dog.

Training that makes sense!

Understanding Your Dog’s mission is simple, help people and their dogs have the best relationship possible. Theresa Pitner, the experienced dog trainer for Understanding Your Dog, accomplishes this by providing training that makes sense to humans so they can enjoy their relationship with their pet.

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Understanding Your Dog’s mission is simple, help people and their dogs have the best relationship possible. Theresa Pitner, the experienced dog trainer for Understanding Your Dog, accomplishes this by providing training that makes sense to humans so they can enjoy their relationship with their pet.